(Source: hudsonchristie, via punkghost)

writingsforwinter:

wake up in the morning like wait can i go back to bed

(Source: airows, via idea-obscura)

euo:

Lauren Kalman

euo:

Lauren Kalman

(via jkaser)

danny-brito:

I’ve been wanting to do a home tour for quite some time, so I was happy that the girls at A Beautiful Mess wanted to host it for me. Click here to see the post over on their blog, it has a little bit of an interview going on with the images.

Comment on their post and let me know what you think, later this week I’ll be posting some outtakes from the shoot! hope you enjoy it!

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Sooooo good

remembering italy this same time last year when i was crying because i didn’t want to come back home to my shitty life and strictly took peace sign mirror pics. good times, i miss you.

writingsforwinter:

FLAWED BUT CLEANING UP

bienenkiste:

Ph. Eeva Rinne

bienenkiste:

Ph. Eeva Rinne

(via handcraftedinvirginia)

The photography of William Eggleston

A native Southerner raised on a cotton plantation in the Mississippi Delta, Eggleston has created a singular portrait of his native South since the late 1960s. After discovering photography in the early 1960s, he abandoned a traditional education and instead learned from photographically illustrated books by Walker Evans, Henri Cartier-Bresson, and Robert Frank. Although he began his career making black-and-white images, he soon abandoned them to experiment with color technology to record experiences in more sensual and accurate terms at a time when color photography was largely confined to commercial advertising. In 1976 with the support of John Szarkowski, the influential photography historian, critic, and curator, Eggleston mounted “Color Photographs” a now famous exhibition of his work at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. William Eggleston’s Guide , in which Szarkowski called Eggleston’s photographs “perfect,” accompanied this groundbreaking one-person show that established his reputation as a pioneer of color photography. His subjects were mundane, everyday, often trivial, so that the real subject was seen to be color itself. These images helped establish Eggleston as one of the first non-commercial photographers working in color and inspired a new generation of photographers, as well as filmmakers. 

Eggleston has published his work extensively. He continues to live and work in Memphis, and travels considerably for photographic projects. (x)

My favorite photographer forever

(Source: vintagegal, via milkteeths)

(Source: badcash, via bbalance)